Paris Transatlantic review by Michael Rosenstein

Simon H. Fell – POSITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS(CF 230)
Since the mid 80s, bassist and composer Simon H. Fell has been developing compositional strategies for working with various combinations of improvisers, classically trained musicians, and pre-recorded electronics, producing along the way a body of incomparable recordings on his Bruce’s Fingers label (he has subtitled these “Compilations”, which, in his notes for Composition No. 62, he describes as pieces which blur “the distinction between jazz, improvised, and classical musics, between immediate and retrospective interaction, between intentional and chance relationships…”). It’s been six years since Composition No. 62, so it’s great to get a chance to hear another one of Fell’s ambitious projects. Positions and Descriptions was commissioned for the 2007 Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, which allowed him to assemble 15 musicians including regulars like Jim Denley, Alex Ward, Rhodri Davies, Philip Thomas, Steve Beresford and Mark Sanders, along with violinist Mifune Tsuji and Americans Tim Berne and Joe Morris (Clark Rundell conducts the ensemble). In his incisive liner notes, Fell describes the piece as combining three overlapping elements: a complex score, a “mobile” system of pre-recorded, inter-related electronic elements, and a series of solo and ensemble improvisations. The five-part structure finds room for cycling thematic kernels, real-time interaction of layered electronics and ensemble, inversions of tango and swing, extrapolations of Webern’s Variations for Orchestra Op. 30, and, of course, extended solos by members of the ensemble. The contrasting timbres and densities are always striking, the buzz and oscillations of electronics countered by tuned percussion, high trilling piccolo, skirling sax, the clarion cry of the trumpet, the clarinet’s rich chalumeau and the seismic rumble of the tubax. Fell avoids both Po-Mo pastiche and full-on assault, instead creating a genuinely impressive musical statement that never subordinates the musicians’ individuality to structural concerns. For those who have been following his ensemble music this one shouldn’t be missed; for those looking for an introduction to one of the most engaging explorers at the intersection of composition and improvisation, dive right in.
http://www.paristransatlantic.com/magazine/monthly2011/09sep_text.html#8

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s