Category Archives: Future releases

Coming soon

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CF 100 release to be released soon!

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Clean Feed will release 7 or 8 new CDs by the end of the year including
CF 100, a historic meeting between Anthony Braxton (reeds) and Joe
Morris (guitar). This is a 4-CD set —a studio recording — of long
improvisations by two of today’s indisputable jazz masters. It should
be out no later than November and is truly an event to look forward to.

We are also proud to announce these other gems that will be available
by late 2007:

Steve Lehman Quartet – Manifold
Dennis González NY Quartet at Tonic – Dance of the Soothsayer’s Tongue
Tamarind Heart (Tony Malaby/William Parker/Nasheet Waits)
Stephen Gauci’s Basso Continuo – Nididhyasana
Júlio Resende – Da Alma
Herb Robertson Ny Downtown Allstars – Real Abberation

Upcoming release – Mário Laginha Trio “Espaço”

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Mário Laginha Trio – Espaço (CF 090)

Commissioned by the Lisbon Architecture Triennale 2007, “Espaço” is more than a wonderful jazz piano trio record. Architecture is the motive sustaining this geometric but organic music: the idea of regular and irregular structures, continuous and discontinuous lines, plane or distorted surfaces, space and absence of space is transferred to the sound world, resulting in a unique opus about form and its contradictions. The aspects are many: street configurations in a city (“Tráfico,” or “Traffic” in English), claustrophobe (“Paredes Que Nos Rodeiam,” or “Surrounding Walls”), and emptiness (“Vazio Urbano,” or “Urban Void,” the theme of this year’s triennale). Portuguese pianist and composer Mário Laginha believes that there are points of contact between the two domains, some conceptual coincidences and even mutual references. And he’s right: architect-engineer-composer Iannis Xenakis once called music “liquid architecture,” and who could better understand that than him. Following Xenakis’ lead, many classical contemporary composers have drawn on architecture to inspire their creative output. But the influence of architecture on jazz composers (with the exception of Argentine Guillermo Gregorio) has been slight. This is new terrain for Laginha, one of the most respected and applauded musicians in Portugal. “You can say the music of this album isn’t very different from what I did before, and I hope not. But I can guarantee that, if it wasn’t the impulse of the architectural subject, it wouldn’t be what it is,” says Mário. With him are bassist Bernardo Moreira and drummer Alexandre Frazão, two essential names in Lisbon’s jazz scene. You won’t regret listening to this.

New Clean Feed Release available May 31st

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Raymond MacDonald / Gunter Baby Sommer – “Delphinus & Lyra” CF 086

Here it is, naked to the bone, free jazz in all its glory, loose, intense and furious, not in hanger but with “joie de vivre.” A sax-drums duo like this, in which one of the performers is Gunter “Baby” Sommer, a hallowed name in European improvised music, makes you anticipate an essentialist approach to the communicative powers of improvisation. This is an encounter of generations, German percussionist and free-jazz pioneer Sommer meets a new presence on the international scene, Scottish saxophonist (and a psychologist, who uses sounds as a therapy for the mentally handicapped) MacDonald. We are all musical, the Glasgow-based MacDonald has lectured. From this universal musicality grow infra-music and hyper-music, music before and after music, nuclear and at the same time cosmic, on the path blazed by John Coltrane and Rashied Ali. The Sommer-MacDonald duo isn’t as spiritual, but the celebration of life is the same. Back in the 60s and 70s Sommer was part of the gang that included Peter Brotzmann, Alexander von Schlippenbach, Peter Kowald, Evan Parker, Leo Smith, and Cecil Taylor when the world was challenged by a new music that rejected both traditional jazz and academic classical composition. He, with his unusual drum kit and literary collaborations, is a living monument. MacDonald is far from being mesmerized by the personal history of his partner: he himself gained the status of one of the most important reedmen in the United Kingdom, with the Burt-MacDonald Quintet, the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra, and gigs with Keith Tippett, Maggie Nicols, Lol Coxhill, Harry Beckett, and other notables. You can’t ignore the energy and fresh perspectives in this joint venture.

New Clean Feed Release available May 31st

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Evan Parker/John Edwards/Chris Corsano – “A Glancing Blow” CF 085

Gee! An Evan Parker album with a new star of the drum kit, Chris Corsano, and one of the most intriguing bassists to emerge in the last few years, John Edwards? This is a record you can’t miss! “A Glancing Blow” is destined to make history. The instruments are the same of Evan’s “classical” trio with Barry Guy and Paul Lytton, but the approach is quite different. The master saxophonist uses his trademark multiphonics and circular breathing techniques in a surprising, new context that only such resourceful musicians could provide. Although Edwards is now a central figure in the improvised music scene in London, playing with the likes of Phil Minton, Tony Bevan, Eddie Prévost and Lol Coxhill, among many others, he has other musical adventures that have little or nothing to do with the improv philosophy, ranging from the metal-noise-jazz band GOD to the “remixers” project Spring Heel Jack. Corsano established his name as a hardcore free player and an expert in sax-drums duos with the likes of Paul Flaherty. Neo-psychedelic rock and folk fans worship him due to his collaborations with the groups Sunburned Hand of the Man, Six Organs of Admittance, and Vibracathedral Orchestra. And noise freaks applaud his work with Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth, Jim O’Rourke, and Nels Cline of Wilco. Prepare yourself: the music here is rough and raw and it takes no prisoners.

New Clean Feed release available May 31st

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Joe Morris / Ken Vandermark / Luther Gray – “Rebus” CF 083

Joe Morris plays guitar on this record, and that is good news. He certainly is one of the best players in that music called “free jazz” that traces its roots to the sixties and seventies. And if on recent records you have longed for Ken Vandermark’s tenor saxophone sound, here it is. After a period of focus on bass and soprano clarinets and on baritone sax, he returns to his first instrument. Only two other titles joining Morris and Vandermark exist, “Like Rays” and “Joe Morris with DKV Trio.” That’s a shame because they function seamlessly together. This third opus makes us believe that this partnership demands a future. And if you have ever wondered why the guitarist is so fond of drummer Luther Gray, “Rebus” explains it all: what a fantastic musician! You’ll find plenty to pick from here: hard-driven, furious music, but also some quiet moments; from sax solos packed with overblowing to almost mainstream finger-picking guitar figures. One moment will have you holding your breath and the next will spur you to relax and slowly let your breath go. These three players never choose the highways when there are other roads to travel; you never know in which direction they’re going to turn. When the trio arrive at its destination, you’ll want to make the journey again: back to the first track. Another listening, another impression of this detailed recording’s nuances.

New Clean Feed releases for April 30th

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CF 079   Anthony Braxton / Joe Fonda – Duets 1995
Anthony Braxton,  reeds
Joe Fonda,  double bass

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CF 080   Joelle Léandre / Pascal Contet – Freeway
Pascal Contet,  accordeon
Joelle Léandre,  double bass

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CF 081   SOUP Sonic Openings Under Pressure – Muhheankuntuk
Patrick Brennan,  alto saxophone
Hilliard Greene,  double bass
David Pleasant,  densemetriX (percussion, harmonica, voice) 

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CF 082   Sten Sandell Trio + John Butcher – Strokes
Sten Sandell,  piano, voice, electronics
Johan Berthling,  doublebass
Paal Nilssen-Love,  drums & percussion