Tag Archives: Michael Moore

All About Jazz review by Mark Corroto

Eric Boeren 4tet – Song For Tracy The Turtle (CF 186)
Mark and his large dog Louie endeavor daily to find and listen to new and interesting sounds.

When Eric Boeren’s 4tet isn’t playing the music of Ornette Coleman, they are playing the music of Ornette Coleman. That is to say, with a Dutch swing.

The leader and cornetist began playing covers in the early 1990s, releasing several quartet recordings of Coleman’s music with Cross Breeding (BVHaast, 1997), Joy Of A Toy (BVHaast, 2001), and Soft Nose (BVHaast, 2001).

And while this album Song For Tracey The Turtle only refers to two Coleman tracks directly, the influence is quite palpable. Without direct allusion to the original Coleman quartet or the later Old And New Dreams band of Don Cherry, Dewey Redman, Ed Blackwell, and Charlie Haden, Boeren along with saxophonist Michael Moore, bassist Wilbert de Joode and drummer Paul Lovens present music that Ornette Coleman circa 1960 would easily recognize and the 2010 Ornette might love.

This disc was taken from a 2004 concert broadcast by Belgian radio and not heard by Boeren until 2008. His quartet is in fine form, frolickingly playing with extended technique to broaden the seemingly simple music Boeren wrote with Coleman in mind.

The music is arranged to allow each player plenty of space. Michael Moore and Wilbert de Joode are featured on “Charmes,” speaking hushed lines to each other. It’s almost as if they’re aside, especially when Boeren takes off with some licks and Lovens whips up the energy. The 4tet seems to have a sense of how to shred a composition, only to reassemble it without a mark. Even their “Free” piece maintains the quartet’s logic. The gentle “Memo” at barely over a minute segues into Eubie Blake’s “Memories Of You,” played straight by Moore’s clarinet and Boeren’s muted cornet with all the sentiment and attitude the song deserves.

The disc ends with the 10-minute “Squirrel Feet/The Legend Of Bebop,” a part Coleman/part Boeren creation which pulls music from Coleman’s The Art of the Improvisers (Atlantic, 1961) recording, but builds upon a 21st century band concept with 20 years of experience. The quartet is unflappable, assembling the melody before breaking it into several pieces to be reconfigured into a blues swing. Smile, Ornette, smile.
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=36768

Stash Dauber review by the Stash Dauber Part 2

A bunch more good jazz (or whatevah) records
Back to the Clean Feed stack…

Eric Boeren – Song for Tracy the Turtle Live at Jazz Brugge 2004 (CF 186)
Dutch cornetist Eric Boeren’s Song for Tracy the Turtle – Live at Jazz Brugge 2004 is a disc that fairly wallows in its Ornettitude, and that’s a good thing. You have to go back to Old and New Dreams to find a band as imbued with the spirit of the pre-Dancing In Your Head Coleman units as Boeren’s 4tet. Not only do they cover four, count ’em, _four_ classic-but-not-overdone O.C. compositions (“Mr. and Mrs. People,” “Free,” “Moon Inhabitants,” and “The Legend of Bebop”), they also essay Ornettish originals, replete with hummable, bluesy unison heads, like “A Fuzzphony” and “Soft Nose.” Boeren individuates most when he blows a muted horn, while Michael Moore shines on both alto and Eb clarinet. Departures include the amorphously open-ended title track (which kicks off the set), and the lovely laments “Memo” and “Memories of You” (the latter a Eubie Blake composition, of all things). I’ll also admit to being a sucker for CDs with pictures of turtles on the cover, especially when executed as exquisitely as Clean Feed’s sleeves always are.

TGB – Evil Things (CF 181)
Perhaps recent listens to Bob Stewart with Arthur Blythe’s ’70s “tuba band” put me in a receptive mood to hear Evil Things by TGB, a tuba-guitar-drums power trio (I do believe the acronym stands for the Portuguese spellings of the instruments’ names). On tuba, Sergio Carolino is an agile soloist; at times, listening to his rides is an experience akin to watching a portly man doing handsprings and cartwheels. Guitarist Mario Delgado is equally splendid on acoustic, electric, dobro, and fretless instruments (dig his taffy-pull long tones on the latter instrument on the curiously bluesy “George Harrison”). His range is represented by the material the trio covers, which ranges from proto-metal (Black Sabbath’s “Planet Caravan” and Deep Purple’s “The Mule,” which serves as a segue out of whirlwind drummer Alexandre Frazao’s solo on “Nameloc”) to country-jazz (Hank Garland’s vehicle “Close Your Eyes” starts out as a tango before erupting into surf-ska frenzy). The program runs the gamut from Gateway Trio-style exploration to Red-era King Crimson menace (there’s even a little grindcore Cookie Monster vocalismo from Paulo Ramos on “Aleister Crowley”). A stunning surprise.

Carlos Bica – Matéria Prima (CF 180)
Delgado’s also a key element on two bassplayer-led sessions. On Labirinto, Dave Hollandesque bassist-composer Carlos Barretto leads a trio, Lokomotiv, with the guitarist and drummer Jose Salgueiro. Delgado explores more tones and textures than the average guitar-slinger would think to in the course of a single session, reinforcing the impression of himself as a European Nels Cline, while the trio reminds you of everything you liked about fusion and ECM back in the ’70s. Leader Barretto’s arco work is particularly gorgeous. Carlos Bica’s Materia Prima opens with the surf-blues of “D.C.” — with a riff straight out of Jimi’s “Voodoo Chile” — before settling into a program of very stylish chamber jazz that includes covers of tunes by Marc Ribot (another discernable influence on Delgado) and Ry Cooder. Bica’s own compositions are moody, atmospheric soundscapes that evoke cinematic images, like John Zorn at his best.
http://stashdauber.blogspot.com/