Tag Archives: Toine Thys

Burning Ambulance review by Phil Freeman

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
Portuguese bassist Hugo Antunes wrote all the tunes on this album, his debut for the Clean Feed label, and it’s ferocious. It swings hard, it’s produced beautifully, and the ensemble is empathetic and aggressive at once. It’s a concise statement—six tracks in 44 minutes, including two takes of “Anfra.” The band is interesting; a two-reed front line (Daniele Martini and Toine Thys, the former on tenor saxophone, the latter on tenor and soprano saxes and bass clarinet), Antunes on bass and two drummers, João Lobo and Marek Patrman. (The liner notes don’t indicate which drummer is in the left channel and which the right.)

The music is largely post-Ornette post-bop; Antunes is a powerful bassist, as he’s gotta be if he’s gonna be the only chordal instrument in the whole ensemble. He pulls the strings like a young Charles Mingus; there are multiple passages during which echoes of “Haitian Fight Song” or “II B.S.” seem to drift through. At other times, he strums the bass like a huge guitar, the way Jimmy Garrison used to behind John Coltrane. Meanwhile, the two saxophonists play not just simultaneously, but together, working their way through intricate melody lines and conversing on the fly. The music occasionally drifts into ultra-free improv that sounds like it should have a capital I, but things always wind up back where they belong, in the realm of muscular, swinging jazz. Lobo and Patrman hit hard when that’s what’s called for, and play off each other very well at all times. Their rhythmic dance is easily the most interesting part of many moments here.

There’s not a whole lot to say about an album like this. Strong compositions, well played by a sympathetic and talented ensemble that, despite being assembled for the date (from multiple countries), comes together with a surety and a sense of common purpose that’s just wildly enjoyable to hear. It would be a very good thing indeed if this ensemble continued to work together in the future, both live and in the studio.
http://burningambulance.com/2011/01/

All About Jazz-Italy review by Libero Farnè

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)Valutazione: 4 stelle
Il catalogo Clean Feed, uno dei più vasti e coerenti nella documentazione di certo avant jazz attuale, raccoglie e spesso fa interagire esponenti americani ed europei. Alcune sedute d’incisione riportano gruppi ben consolidati o situazioni di particolare consistenza progettuale, altre sembrano documentare sodalizi più occasionali con esiti oscillanti. Roll Call, registrato in uno studio di Bruxelles in data non precisata, sembra collocarsi a metà strada fra queste due categorie. Senza rientrare fra le cose indispensabili dell’etichetta portoghese, la qualità della musica, l’attualità e l’onestà culturale dell’approccio testimoniano tuttavia l’alto livello medio raggiunto appunto dalla Clean Feed.
Il CD costituisce il biglietto da visita di Hugo Antunes, nato in Portogallo nel 1974 ma formatosi musicalmente anche in Belgio e altrove. Come contrabbassista non appartiene alla categoria dei virtuosi, ma possiede un drive pulsante ed efficace; si dimostra inoltre compositore aggiornato, in linea con certe esperienze attuali, e leader sensibile, capace di innescare la motivazione dei partner.

L’impianto tematico di “Dukkha” è abbastanza semplice, ma viene nobilitato e sviluppato in modo mosso dall’intreccio dialogante dei due bravi sassofonisti e dalla trama ritmica, incalzante e variata negli accenti, fornita dai due batteristi, João Lobo e Marek Patrman, il primo dei quali ben noto in Italia per aver militato nei gruppi di Giovanni Guidi. Il ricorso a due ance e a due batterie costituisce appunto la scelta vincente di Antunes, permettendogli di impostare una griglia strutturale e timbrica che qualifica la musica in tutto l’arco del CD.

“Roll Call” è caratterizzato da una sequenza di brevi sezioni diverse: si passa dell’iniziale fosco e statico brulicare collettivo ad episodi ossessivamente martellanti, ad altri dallo swing più jazzistico. L’incipit di “Høyspenning” e di “Anfra” è affidato al contrabbasso del leader per poi addentrarsi subito in mosse evoluzioni. A differenza che negli altri brani, in “Einfach,” dall’incedere lento e decantato, si dà maggior peso alla scrittura ed all’arrangiamento, che in questo caso divengono elementi vincolanti.
http://italia.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=6172

Lira review by Leif Carlsson

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
Eurofri jazz. Två träblås, två trumslagare och så ledarenoch basisten Hugo Antunes. Som Malachi Favors i de tidigaArt Ensemble of Chicago står han med fötterna djupt icentrum av denna kvintett från Portugal, Italien, Belgienoch Tjeckien.De spelar en fri jazz med rötter i sextiotalet. Antunes sexkompositioner är ett slags stommar att bygga på. Detamerikanska smälter ihop med ett nutida Europa, särskilthos slagverken. Musiken resonerar som Archie Sheppkunde göra på den tiden med sin inblandning av nyakärvare insikter i det välkända. Blåsarna konverserar meddig som lyssnare och håller sig i normalregistret. Trummorna kompletterar varandra ochspelar luftigt och utan trängsel. Bandet kringlar sig framåt melodiskt, ett oslipat kollektivsom hellre vill kommunicera än fila på sin yta.

Burning Ambulance review by Phil Freeman

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
Portuguese bassist Hugo Antunes wrote all the tunes on this album, his debut for the Clean Feed label, and it’s ferocious. It swings hard, it’s produced beautifully, and the ensemble is empathetic and aggressive at once. It’s a concise statement—six tracks in 44 minutes, including two takes of “Anfra.” The band is interesting; a two-reed front line (Daniele Martini and Toine Thys, the former on tenor saxophone, the latter on tenor and soprano saxes and bass clarinet), Antunes on bass and two drummers, João Lobo and Marek Patrman. (The liner notes don’t indicate which drummer is in the left channel and which the right.)

The music is largely post-Ornette post-bop; Antunes is a powerful bassist, as he’s gotta be if he’s gonna be the only chordal instrument in the whole ensemble. He pulls the strings like a young Charles Mingus; there are multiple passages during which echoes of “Haitian Fight Song” or “II B.S.” seem to drift through. At other times, he strums the bass like a huge guitar, the way Jimmy Garrison used to behind John Coltrane. Meanwhile, the two saxophonists play not just simultaneously, but together, working their way through intricate melody lines and conversing on the fly. The music occasionally drifts into ultra-free improv that sounds like it should have a capital I, but things always wind up back where they belong, in the realm of muscular, swinging jazz. Lobo and Patrman hit hard when that’s what’s called for, and play off each other very well at all times. Their rhythmic dance is easily the most interesting part of many moments here.

There’s not a whole lot to say about an album like this. Strong compositions, well played by a sympathetic and talented ensemble that, despite being assembled for the date (from multiple countries), comes together with a surety and a sense of common purpose that’s just wildly enjoyable to hear. It would be a very good thing indeed if this ensemble continued to work together in the future, both live and in the studio.
http://burningambulance.com/2011/01/21/hugo-antunes/

Le Son du Grisli review by Pierre Cécile

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
Jusqu’à la semaine dernière, je ne savais rien d’Hugo Antunes, ce contrebassiste portugais fier comme un rock qui en appelle au roll (le jeu de mots est tout trouvé parce que Roll Call est un disque de jazz musculeux !).

Pas de romantisme en vogue et jamais d’exagération chez Antunes. Plutôt des rondeurs généreuses qui vont bien au jazz qu’il joue avec Daniele Martini et Toine Thys aux saxophones & Joao Lobo et Marek Patrman aux batteries. Le secret est-il dans la présence de ces deux batteurs ? Peut-être, le tout est que cette musique coule de source, est agréable à entendre et si l’on veut intéressante à décortiquer. Antunes met sa jeunesse et sa fougue au service du jazz et le résultat est surprenant…
http://grisli.canalblog.com/archives/2011/01/13/20113641.html

Gapplegate Music review by Grego Edwards

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
The more I hear of the Portuguese jazz scene the more impressive it seems to me. That’s mostly thanks to the big ears of the folks at Clean Feed and their ambitious release schedule. Take today’s CD, for example, Hugo Antunes’ Roll Call (Clean Feed 197). I’m not precisely sure who in this sextet is and who isn’t on the Portuguese scene (the CD was recorded in Brussels) but it illustrates my point nonetheless. Hugo plays a solid avant bass and writes some adventurous material. Joining him are two winds and two drummers: Daniele Martini on tenor and Toine Thys on tenor, soprano and bass clarinet; the two drummers are Joao Lobo and Marek Patrman. This is music that breathes fire yet also gives contrasting space and runs through contrasting arranged, written and improvised routines that mix it up enough that one’s attention remains focused throughout. It’s a kind of in-and-out sensibility that much on Clean Feed puts forward these days. Yet Hugo Antunes’ group does not in any way sound generic or derivative. I am occasionally reminded of the group sound of Jack DeJohnette’s Special Edition band from the seventies, when Chico Freeman switched to the bass clarinet to contrast with the tenor of David Murray while the piano-less ensemble took the tempo loosely and convincingly. Now that’s just a matter of the sound, and Antunes’ group is not otherwise playing the mimic to that remarkable ensemble. And here we have two drummers, not one, working especially well together, one drummer’s sound and execution contrasting with the other’s at all points. And sometimes they kick up a hell of a row, inciting the horn men to both dizzying heights and tightly focuses interaction. Both Thys and Martini are very good players. They sound good singly and, especially, working in tandem on double improvisations and arranged routines. Roll Call constitutes another surprise, a sleeper, a jazz wolf in sheep’s clothing. You look at the cover, you say to yourself, “OK…” Then you play the CD a few times and you say, “OK!!”
It’s a goody. Give us some more of this, Hugo!
http://gapplegateguitar.blogspot.com/

Goddeau Magazine review by Guy Peters

Hugo Antunes – Roll Call (CF 197)
Het Portugese Clean Feed mag intussen dan wel bekend staan om het uitbrengen van werk van Amerikaanse en Scandinavische veteranen en talenten, eigen volk wordt ook niet vergeten. Zo krijgt de nog jonge, in Brussel verblijvende bassist Hugo Antunes ook de mogelijkheid om z’n kans te wagen. Met succes, want Roll Call weet perfect z’n beperkingen in troeven om te buigen.

Opener “Dukkha” biedt meteen een prima staalkaart, met een pulserende bas, waarover twee saxen lange uithalen neerleggen, terwijl de drummers soms nog bezig lijken met hun soundcheck, de onderdelen van hun drumkit aanhalend, ritmes uittestend. Een heel nummer van dit zou je nog een gebrek aan richting kunnen verwijten, maar een wending komt er na twee en een halve minuut, als Antunes de teugels plots in handen neemt, de kompanen bij de les roept en een fijn stukje swingende free op poten zet, waarbij vooral het laidback karakter van de muziek benadrukt wordt. Geen grote statements of opschepperij, maar losjes, soulvol en met sprekend gemak uitgevoerd.

Bovenal is het jazz met een open karakter, die z’n tijd neemt en beweegt op een zuiders tempo. Iets gerichter gaat het er aan toe in het titelnummer, dat van start gaat met Thys’ aanzetten op basklarinet, plaagstoten die snel al overgenomen worden door de andere vier. Het is een wat merkwaardig stuk, nu eens hoekig, verschuivend van het ene solostuk naar het andere, en dan weer vol vlugge interactie met staccato uithalen en bijna hysterisch gerammel. Het werkt hier echter opnieuw prima als een schoteltje gemengd, waarbij de luisteraar het hele gamma kan voorproeven.

Het best van al werkt Roll Call in de meer ingetogen songs. Zo gaat “Høyspenning” van start met een gerekte bassolo en krijg je daarna iets dat je best zou kunnen omschrijven als bezwerende lyriek: een vrijage van twee saxen (met Thys deze keer op sopraan) op een achtergrond van hypnotiserende drums, die opnieuw kiezen voor inkleuren zonder de spanning te verbreken. Nog sfeervoller is “Einfach”, dat z’n naam grotendeels waarmaakt: van de eenvoud wordt hier een deugd gemaakt, met een op cimbalen uitgewerkte intro en vervolgens een lyrisch spel van zwijmelende saxen die elkaar mooi aanvullen, contouren suggererend en valstrikken ontwijkend.

De ’alternate take’ van het bluesier “Anfra” niet meegerekend, blijft Roll Call ruim onder veertig minuten. Dat is een verademing in de jazzwereld, waar more nog al te vaak much more is. Je kan het bezwaarlijk een opvallend of vernieuwend album noemen en het is niet het soort plaat dat je bij de lurven grijpt om drie kwartier later pas te lossen. Gelukkig is het evenmin een voorbeeld van zelfoverschatting, pretentie of onsamenhangend gemasturbeer. Het is een mooi brokje free jazz, dat met een been stevig in de traditie staat en met het ander doet wat het wil zonder daarbij de controle uit het oog te verliezen. Het resultaat is dan ook een geslaagde, warme entree met een groeimarge die belooft voor de toekomst.

Antunes & co. spelen een resem concerten in België (o.a. in Gent, Brussel en Mechelen) in het voorjaar. Meer info op de MySpace-pagina.
http://www.goddeau.com/content/view/8485